Single Intra-articular Platelet-Rich Plasma Versus Corticosteroid Injections in the Treatment of Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder: A Cohort Study.

A comparison of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to corticosteroid in adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) found PRP to be better at decreasing pain and improving range of motion and disability. 28 patients received PRP and 27 patients received corticosteroid and results were measured at 12 weeks post-injection.

The Takeaway: Frozen shoulder is routinely treated with physical therapy and NSAIDs but it can take many months to a year to finally get back to normal. If that fails, surgery or corticosteroid injections may help, but these options come at the risk of side effects and/or complications. Dr. Silva treats frozen shoulders with a method called capsular distension (also known as hydro dilation) where high volume injections into the shoulder are followed by passive range of motion to release the adhesions which impair shoulder movement. Patients leave with a profound increase in range of motion the same day of treatment and can expect an accelerated recovery for any adhesions remaining. This method has minimal side effects and complications, and is considered superior to high-dose corticosteroids and surgery. Once the range of motion is back to normal, Dr. Silva will then identify the cause of the frozen shoulder, commonly due to an inflammatory condition, underlying chronic degeneration, or acute injury.

Reference:
Barman A, Et Al. Single Intra-articular Platelet-Rich Plasma Versus Corticosteroid Injections in the Treatment of Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder: A Cohort Study. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2019 Jul;98(7):549-557.

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